Sunday, July 10, 2016

6 foods to boost your brainpower


Eating well is good for your mental as well as your physical health. The brain requires nutrients just like your heart, lungs or muscles do. But which foods are particularly important to keep our grey matter happy and healthy

Foods high in compounds such as antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids can improve brain health and memory, experts say.
From fruit to fish, here are six things that, based on various studies, may perk up your gray matter.
Eat more nuts

They even look like little brains, so maybe that's Mother Nature's way of telling us what walnuts are good for.

Indeed, a 2009 study in the Journal of Nutrition found that diets in which nuts made up as little as 2 percent reversed signs of aging in the brains of old rats, including the ability of the brain to function and process information.

And a study presented in 2010 at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease reported that mice with Alzheimer's demonstrated improved learning, memory and motor coordination after being fed walnuts.

Walnuts contain high amounts of antioxidants, which some researchers say may combat the damage to brain cells' DNA caused by free radicals in our bodies

Carrots

Carrots have long been known to be good for the eyes and it turns out, they're good for the brain, too.

Carrots have high levels of a compound called luteolin , which could reduce age-related memory deficits and inflammation in the brain, according to a study published in 2010 in the journal Nutrition. In the study, mice whose daily diet was supplemented with 20 milligrams of luteolin had reduced inflammation in their brains. The researchers said the compound also restored the mice's memory to the level of younger mice's.

Olive oil, peppers and celery are also high in luteolin.


Berries

Adding some vitamin-rich berries to your diet may not be a bad idea if you want to improve your memory, according to several studies.

One study, published in 2010 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, found that after 12 weeks of daily supplements of wild blueberry juice, nine older adults who had started to experience slight memory problems showed better learning and recall abilities than a similar group of adults who didn't take the supplements. The blueberry group also showed reduced symptoms of depression.

And in a 2009 report in the Journal of Nutrition, researchers said they examined a group of studies that showed fruits such as blueberries and strawberries, which are high in antioxidants, can decrease a type of stress in cells associated with aging and increase the signaling capabilities in brains. In one of the studies, researchers placed 6-month-old rats on a diet supplemented with blueberry and strawberry extracts (totaling 2 percent of their diet) for nine months. These rats had better spatial and memory skills than rats not given the supplements.

Eat oily fish


Although recent research has shown that taking fish oil supplements may not help slow the cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease, other studies have shown that eating fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids could help slow typical cognitive decline that comes with age.

A 2005 study in the journal Archives of Neurology found that people 65 and older who ate two meals of fish a week for six years had a 13 percent decrease in cognitive decline, compared with people who didn't eat any fish regularly. And people who ate one meal of fish a week had a 10 percent decrease in cognitive decline.

Fish high in vitamin B12 may also help protect against Alzheimer's , according to a study published in 2010 in the journal Neurology.


Coffee and tea

Coffee and tea do more than keep you awake in the mornings studies have shown they may prevent Alzheimer's disease and improve cognitive function.

A 2010 study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease found that when researchers gave caffeinated coffee to mice genetically engineered to develop Alzheimer's disease, the disease either slowed in progression or never developed. Based on the finding, coffee eventually could serve as a therapeutic treatment for people with Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said.

Tea showed protective effects on the brain, too. Tea drinkers did better on tests on memory and information processing than non-tea drinkers did, according to a 2010 study of 716 Chinese adults 55 and older in the Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging

Spinach

The green leafy vegetable is loaded with vitamins C and E, which, studies have shown, help to improve cognitive abilities.
A 2000 study in the Journals of Gerontology showed that rats whose diet was supplemented with vitamin E experienced a 500 to 900 percent increase in brain and nerve tissue over an eight-month period, as well as an increase in the release of dopamine in the brain, the "pleasure" chemical that controls flow of information to different parts of the brain.
And a 2000 study in the journal Brain Research found that aging rats had some of their age-related memory and motor deficits reversed after they were fed diets supplemented with spinach, strawberries or blueberries.

Pass it on: To amp up your brain health and slow cognitive decline, eat your leafy greens, berries, nuts and fish

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Looking gorgeous and getting ready in under 10 minutes!

1. Use an in-shower moisturizer.
If you hate taking a shower, toweling off, lotioning up, and then waiting a while for your moisturizer to sink in, throw an in-shower moisturizer into your mix. After lathering up with your usual body cleanser, apply a hydrating formula Moisture In-Shower Body Lotionfrom your neck down. The warmth and humidity of the shower opens up your pores, allowing the moisturizing ingredients (hi, shea butter) to be absorbed into your skin, so that after you rinse and towel off, your skin remains super soft. Genius, right?


2. Wrap your hair in a microfiber towel post-shower.
"Gather your hair into a microfiber towel, wrap it on top of your head, and allow it to soak up any excess water while you apply your skincare regimen. The microfiber fabric absorbs water through osmosis, wicking it away. And since 80 percent of your blow-drying time is used removing the water from your hair, this simple step will cut your drying time in half and get you out the door quicker."

3. Choose one multitasking hair product and apply it with a vent brush to evenly distribute it.
"Applying several products to your hair takes time, So to speed up your routine, use one styling product that does multiple things, and then apply it using a vent brush for even application. Once you've brushed the product into your hair, rinse off your brush and continue styling as you normally would. 

4. Skip a full face of makeup and just apply red lipstick.
"If you're really squeezed for time, apply some red lipstick, You'll look like you spent an hour doing your 'makeup' when you spent only two minutes."



5. Curl your eyelashes, apply some mascara, and go!
Curling your eyelashes seems like an unnecessary step, but it can actually be the only preparation your eyes need to look polished. Doing so not only makes your eyes look more open and awake, but after you apply mascara onto your lashes and trace the inner upper rim of your eye with black liner, your fringe will appear fuller — like you're wearing falsies. At that point, you can skip eye shadow and go!.
6. Revive curly hair with a shine spray.

If you have curly hair or second-day waves that you want to revive, what I often reach for on set in a pinch is an aerosol shine spray, The challenge curly-haired girls have is that their curls absorb the light, making them appear dull. So what the aerosol shine spray does is fills any empty pockets in the curls with its lightweight, tiny molecules that then help reflect the light, making the curls look defined and beautiful.


7. Opt for all cream cosmetics and use your fingers to apply them.
By using your fingers to apply your makeup, you eliminate the time it takes to find the right brush, apply your makeup perfectly using each tool, and then washing them after to avoid bacteria build-up.

8.Having a bad hair day? Throw it into a polished, yet undone chignon.
Everyone has a bad hair day, so when one strikes, throw your hair up into a pretty, low side bun, pin it into place with bobby pins, and go.

9. Skip highlighter around your eyes and just use concealer.
Instead of taking the extra time to add highlighter to the inner corners of your eyes, apply your concealer to cancel out any darkness and lighten those areas up,

10. Get stand-out brows without messing with powders and pencils.
Mixing pencils and powders to fill in sparse spots within your eyebrows can be time-consuming, Instead, use a colored brow mascara. It saves a ton of time because all you have to do is swipe the bristle brush over the tiny hairs and your brows will immediately look fuller. Just make sure to wipe down the brush a bit, so you don't apply too much of the formula onto your brows. You want them to look enhanced, not unnatural.

Friday, July 8, 2016

Sesame Seeds Benefit

Sesame seeds are truly one of the most ancient foods on earth. In fact, sesame plants are the oldest known plant species to be grown primarily for their seeds (pods) and oils rather than for their leaves, fruit or vegetables.

Highly valued in eastern, Mediterranean and African cultures, sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum) have been used for thousands of years to flavor foods, provide essential fats and enhance skin health. Sesame has one of the highest oil contents of any seed and a rich, nutty flavor, which is why sesame oil, tahini and the seeds themselves are common ingredients in cuisines across the world.
One tablespoon of whole sesame seeds has about:

  • 52 calories
  • 4 grams fat
  • 1 gram carbs
  • 2 grams of protein
  • 4 milligrams copper (18 percent DV)
  • 2 milligrams manganese (11 percent DV)
  • 87 milligrams calcium (9 percent DV)
  • 31 milligrams magnesium (8 percent DV)
  • 3 milligrams iron (7 percent DV)
  • 57 milligrams phosphorus (6 percent DV)
  • 7 milligrams zinc (5 percent DV)
  • 1 milligrams thiamine (5 percent DV)

Sesame seeds are an excellent source of copper, a very good source of manganese, and a good source of magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, molybdenum, and selenium.
In addition, copper plays an important role in the activity of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme needed for the cross-linking of collagen and elastin—the ground substances that provide structure, strength and elasticity in blood vessels, bones and joints.
Copper is known for its use in reducing some of the pain and swelling of rheumatoid arthritis. Copper's effectiveness is due to the fact that this trace mineral is important in a number of antiinflammatory and antioxidant enzyme systems.
Sesame helps lower cholesterol levels, because it contains phytosterols that block cholesterol production. Black sesame seeds are especially high in phytosterols.

The high copper content in sesame seeds prevents and relieves arthritis, and strengthens bones, joints and blood vessels.
Not only are sesame seeds an excellent source of copper and a very good source of manganese, but they are also a good source of calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc, molybdenum, selenium, and dietary fiber. In addition to these important nutrients, sesame seeds contain two unique substances: sesamin and sesamolin. Both of these substances belong to a group of special beneficial fibers called lignans, and have been shown to have a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans, and to prevent high blood pressure and increase vitamin E supplies in animals. Sesamin has also been found to protect the liver from oxidative damage.


In traditional Chinese medicine, there is a relationship between the liver and eyes. The liver sends blood to the eyes to support functioning. Black sesame seeds are the best for this.
Oil pulling has been used for oral health for thousands of years in Ayurveda to reduce dental plaque, whiten your teeth, and boost overall health.

Hair BenefitsSesame seed oil is full of the nutrients needed for a healthy scalp and hair. See how to use sesame oil in your hair


Prevents Cancer
Sesame seeds contain anti-cancer compounds including phytic acid, magnesium, and phytosterols. Sesame seeds have the highest phytosterol content of all seeds and nuts.

Alleviates Anemia
Black sesame seeds are particularly rich in iron. They’re highly recommended for those with anemia and weakness.

Good for Digestion 
The high fiber content of sesame seeds helps the intestines with elimination.


For Healthy Skin
The high zinc content helps produce collagen, giving skin more elasticity and helping repair damaged body tissues. Regular use of sesame oil can reduce skin cancer.

Zinc for Bone Health

Another reason for older men to make zinc-rich foods such as sesame seeds a regular part of their healthy way of eating is bone mineral density. Although osteoporosis is often thought to be a disease for which postmenopausal women are at highest risk, it is also a potential problem for older men. 

There is a little bit of controversy about sesame seeds and calcium, because there is a substantial difference between the calcium content of hulled versus unhulled sesame seeds. When the hulls remain on the seeds, one tablespoon of sesame seeds will contains about 88 milligrams of calcium. When the hulls are removed, this same tablespoon will contain about 37 milligrams (about 60% less). Tahini—a spreadable paste made from ground sesame seeds—is usually made from hulled seeds (seeds with the hulls removed, called kernels), and so it will usually contain this lower amount of calcium.
The term "sesame butter" can sometimes refer to tahini made from sesame seed kernels, or it can also be used to mean a seed paste made from whole sesame seeds—hull included.
Although the seed hulls provide an additional 51 milligrams of calcium per tablespoon of seeds, the calcium found in the hulls appears in large part to be found in the form of calcium oxalate. This form of calcium is different than the form found in the kernels, and it is a less absorbable form of calcium. So even though a person would be likely to get more calcium from sesame seeds or sesame seed butter that contained the hulls, there is a question about how much more calcium would be involved. It would defintely be less than the 51 additional milligrams found in the seed hulls.